New Tangled Tango #70

Previously

On one occasion she had dropped her notepad, hoping that he might pick it up: he had, gallant to the last. As he returned it, she made sure that their hands touched. As she prepared to get onto the bus, she turned, touched his arm and said how nice it had been talking to him – and that, perhaps they could do it again on Wednesday. She had started to accustomise him to these small, but intimate gestures.

She had been sure to invite him to walk down to the gate with her and her pupils where they would get on the bus.

Continued

Tuesday 17th May  St Philip’s Church Hall

The evening began as usual. The dry but cloudy day had ended with a slight drizzle moving in from the West. The chairs and tables had been set out and Cathy and Steve were able to sit together. There wasn’t much opportunity for Steve to say much to her about the events of the day, but he did let her know in general terms that everything seemed to be going to plan.

She had come in a black silk blouse and woollen slacks that bore a small black and white houndstooth check. He wore a white open-necked shirt and new, light-grey trousers.

Geoff’s first announcement was that all the money for the Blackpool trip had now been received,

Some newcomers were among those dancing, so Geoff had chosen the first dance to be a progressive one, so that every man danced a few steps with each woman in turn as they progressed, as the name suggests, around the room. Women dancers formed an outer circle and men the inner. Each partner had to introduce himself or herself to their new partner and to complete one complete move of the dance. Each such move ended with either a turn-under or a doh-si-doh. Cathy watched over her shoulder, seeing Steve dance with other women, wishing it were her dancing with him. He looked so accomplished in his moves.

There was a certain amount of talk among the group between dances, about what they hoped to do with any spare-time at Blackpool, but soon it was time for the next dance. Geoff had picked a Tango Serida – an old-time tango. The first of the two pieces of music was ‘A New-Fangled Tango’ adapted for strict tempo.

The dance involved a lot of chasses – side-close-side steps – both in line and diagonally. The diagonal steps brought them close together as did a contra-check. It was during some of these close-hold steps that Steve had said to Cathy that there should be a dance called ‘A New Tangled Tango.’

“What?” she asked, “because of the constant changes in direction?”

“In a way,” he said, “I’m thinking about myself and Marjorie at the moment – walks in promenade, contra-checks, chasses, walks in line-of-dance or against line-of-dance. My brain’s getting frazzled trying to keep up with her changes of tactic.”

She laughed.

“Don’t you keep thinking of Marjorie while you’re dancing with me. I’m your partner tonight,” she said, primly but smiling.

“And for the rest of our lives,” he said to appease her.

“Just take care,” she said.

As they left, the last of the light was just leaving the dark blue skies. The street- lights had not been on long. They held each other tightly as they kissed goodnight, not wanting to part.

Today’s photos are used both to represent both the scene in the social dance and the metaphorical footwork of their counter-active planning to defuse Marjorie’s scheme.

EXIF data were: Fujifilm X-T4 26 MP cropped-sensor mirrorless camera with a Fujinon XF 16-55 mm f/2.8 lens. 1/1000 secs @ f/2.8 and 55 mm. ISO was 6400.

Author: writingandphotography0531

I am a retired local government officer. At that time, I was an IT manager and had associated responsibilities for training. I have previously been involved, in various organisations, with aspects of industrial training and management development. My hobby is photography and, until recently, hillwalking in Snowdonia. I have just written my first novel, Persephone and the Photographer, published as a Kindle eBook.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s