Scotland Revisited #7

From an interesting ramble around St Stephen’s graveyard at Stoneykirk, we drove down the East coast of the peninsula to the Mull of Galloway – the most southerly point of Scotland – and its lighthouse.

On the way, as we were so close to the sea, we parked by the roadside to walk along the pebbly beach.

As we approached, we were disappointed to see how foggy it was, and how the upper part of the lighthouse at the Mull of Galloway was obscured by the mist.

There was an interesting notice board explaining the role of the nation’s lighthouses.

I liked this signpost, pointing out that Senegal, 2800 miles away, is the winter home of the gannets which spend there summer in Galloway.

Visibility below ground level was much better and afforded a great view of the rocky coastline.

Occasionally, the mist lifted slightly and the lighthouse’s own lighting improved the view.

The area provided a nice circular walk that included passing some of the local heather.

Featured Photo

During our circular walk, we happened upon this pretty cottage that is also a café for visitors.

EXDF data were: 1/320 secs @ f/5.6 and 16 mm. ISO was 160.

Author: writingandphotography0531

I am a retired local government officer. At that time, I was an IT manager and had associated responsibilities for training. I have previously been involved, in various organisations, with aspects of industrial training and management development. My hobby is photography and, until recently, hillwalking in Snowdonia. I have just written my first novel, Persephone and the Photographer, published as a Kindle eBook.

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