Three’s company

Greg and Alison have moved into the flat and, while their parents have helped tremendously, the couple are grateful to have their independence at last as they start their new lives. Mums and Dads might be looking forward to grandchildren, but this cash-strapped couple are looking ahead.

Meanwhile, the talked-of, three-way, cross-referencing deal between Alison, Greg (per pro Tom) and Katie’s salon has started paying dividends with sixteen group customers during the first year – in addition to any other walk-in business other than planned weddings.

I haven’t had as much time to write today – for various reasons – but, I’ve added about 1300 words. I concluded the day’s writing with a short chapter in which Tom speaks of his retirement plans and asks Greg for his reactions. As Tom had hoped, Greg does want to take over as tenant if he and Tom can fix it with the landlord, but both of them are aware of the costs that Greg and Alison will have to think about in the three years before Tom leaves for his retirement.

Greg has told Tom that renting the shop with its current goodwill and great passing trade would be a dream come true – but he’ll want to make changes. For a start he’ll want to get rid of the darkroom and the film-based photography so loved b y Tom. Even in 2002, Greg knows that he’ll have to be ready for a digital world. Additionally he wants to use one room as a portrait studio, another as a gallery and a third as a video-editing suite. He wants to start selling digital cameras and accessories and will need to display and store them properly. Lots of shopfitting to finance then.

Today’s featured photograph is of Windleshaw Chantry in a section of St Helens Cemetery, reserved, in its time, for Roman Catholic burials. The Chantry Building predates the reign of King Henry VIII. I chose this image because it seems suitably spooky as we approach Halloween.

I took the shot using my old Pentax K-50 mounted on a tripod. I used a film vintage 35 mm f’2.4 prime lens at 35mm with an aperture of f/22, ISO 100 and shutter speed of half a second.

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