Brain Fog

This Blog is the only writing that I’ve done today. It seems that I’ve been spending too long staring at this screen lately – up to eight or even nine hours per day. I’d realised that my head had sometimes felt strange for the past week or so, but I had put it down to postural hypotension – an older persons’ problem of dizziness after standing too quickly after being sat down for a while.

When I arose this morning, I felt as though my brain was loose in my head in a sludgy pond; I couldn’t express the words I wanted to say; I couldn’t work out in what order to perform the simplest tasks. It also felt as though my loose brain was weighing down and putting pressure on my eyes. Added to all that was the feeling of tiredness. In short, my brain had fogged over.

Maybe some people always feel like that first thing , but I’m usually a morning person; aches and stiffness -yes, but I’m normally as bright as a button, fully ready to start my day.

I googled the symptoms. Straightaway different sources informed me that brain fog is an actual medical condition. Who knew? It seems that, as often as not, it’s the result of too much mental exertion – the remedy being to pace oneself better; to have a rest for a few hours or days.

I want to get back to writing; to my characters and the plot – but not at the cost of feeling like I did this morning. I do feel much better tonight as I write this, but I won’t be staying up late writing as I have been doing. I’ll see how I feel in the morning.

To accompany a condition such as brain fog, I’ve chosen an image of a foggy morning in Sutton Park, St Helens, Merseyside. I captured the image last December using my Pentax KP 24 MP cropped sensor camera using a 16-85 mm f/3.5-5.6 lens at 35 mm and f/5.6. The ISO was 200 and the shutter speed 1/80 seconds.

I chose a black and white rendition that I felt conveyed the feeling better.

Leave a Reply